The United States is more than able to continue supplying global customers with the necessary grains, according to the U.S Grains Council, the leading organization for export market development for barley, corn, sorghum and co-products. Citing the release of the USDA’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE), the Council said domestic corn, barley and sorghum production forecasts are up, indicating bountiful harvests; sorghum exports are also raised due to an increase of supplies.

According to USGC President and CEO Ken Hobbie, such news should serve as reassurance to global customers who rely on the United States to meet their food and feed demands.

“With the production of all three commodities of corn, sorghum and barley, as well as their co-products up from the previous forecast, our international customers can be assured that U.S. producers have substantial supplies to support their needs,” he said.

The report released today shows corn production forecast at 12.2 billion bushels, raised 128 million bushels from the previous estimate. U.S. sorghum production is also up, raised 38 million bushels this month, as increased area more than offsets a reduction in forecast yields. Barley production is also increased, raised 22 million bushels. Exports show an increase for sorghum which is raised 10 million bushels. Overall feed and residual use for 2008/09 is raised 150 million bushels, also based on larger supplies.

“We have been fortunate enough to have strong harvests for barely and sorghum commodities this fall. As farmers work diligently to harvest the corn crop, we are confident the supply will be abundant enough to meet all global demands from ethanol to exports,” said Hobbie. “U.S. farmers should be recognized for the hard work they have done to ensure the United States remains a competitive world supplier of grains.”