Pheromone-infused twist ties will be applied by ground crews to host plants, trees and fence posts in the community of Carpinteria, Santa Barbara County, where two light brown apple moths have been detected. Moth pheromone, which is odorless and colorless, creates mating disruption by preventing male moths from mating with females. This method is highly specific to the targeted moth population and is not harmful to other organisms.

LBAM threatens California's environment by destroying, stunting or deforming young seedlings and damaging new growth in the forest canopy. The moth also feeds on host plants favored by a number of endangered species; spoils the appearance of ornamental plants; and injures citrus, grapes, and deciduous fruit tree crops.

A cooperative eradication program run jointly by CDFA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is already underway to suppress and eradicate infestations in nine other counties along California's Central Coast and Bay Area.