Two free trainings will be offered by the UC Davis California AgrAbility Project and Ergonomics Roundtable of Sacramento for rehabilitating injured and disabled farmers and farmworkers. The trainings will be held in Sacramento and Fresno in July.

The trainings are open to health, ergonomic, occupational and physical therapists, human resources and vocational rehabilitation professionals who work with clientele in agriculture. Participants will learn the risks of farm and ranch work and strategies for helping patients overcome work barriers.

Speaker Carla Wilhite, University of North Dakota occupational therapy professor and former Colorado Agrability director, will discuss cultural considerations when treating farmers and farmworkers, making treatment plans to meet the needs of a farm patient and methods for safely returning a patient to the farm. Wilhite is a nationally recognized expert in on-farm assessment and adaptive equipment and technology. She teaches independent living and working with disabilities.

More than 20,000 disabling injuries occur on California farms each year, according to UC Davis research. In addition, farmers and farmworkers experience injuries and illnesses that the general public suffers as well.

The Sacramento training will be on July 1, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the State Compensation Insurance Fund building in the first floor conference room at 2275 Gateway Oaks Drive.

The Fresno training will be on July 2, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the State Compensation Insurance Fund building in the first floor conference room at 10 River Park Pl. E.

To register, go to http://www.ergort.org/Meetings.html or e-mail Ann Pudoff at apudoff@brsrisk.com by June 25. For more information about the free training, contact Martha Stiles, CalAgrAbility program director at mcstiles@ucdavis.edu or (530) 752-2606.

The UC Davis California AgrAbility Project, or CalAgrAbility, is a USDA-funded program working in partnership with the Northeastern California Arthritis Foundation.

CalAgrAbility is a free service that helps farmers and workers design and customize assistance plans based on the type of farming operation or job tasks. Staff considers and assesses the needs of the injured or disabled individual as well as those of his or her family. CalAgrAbility helps these individuals continue working on farms. Some conditions are very common such as arthritis, deteriorating vision, hearing loss or mobility problems while others are more serious, such as amputations or spinal or brain injuries. For more information about CalAgrAbility, e-mail calagra@ucdavis.edu or go to http://calagrability.ucdavis.edu.