One has only to contemplate the rapidly rolling numbers on the service station pump to understand the need for a reliable, affordable, domestic energy supply.

Over the past few months motorists have paid more than $3 a gallon for fuel to get them to work, to markets and to even more critical locales such as hospitals. And folks who drive for a living, long haul truckers, for instance, have been hammered by high energy costs.

As have farmers, ranchers and others involved in producing and transporting food and fiber.

The cost to heat and cool homes and businesses also has risen precipitously over the past two years. And we’re paying higher prices for anything, which is pretty much everything, we use that requires energy to manufacture or market.

Most days we may not acknowledge it and we may not act like it but the country faces an energy crisis that threatens to alter our way of life and possibly our national security.

We are much too dependent on nations that either don’t particularly like us or are too unstable to rely on for too much of our energy supply. At least part of the solution to this national dilemma can be found within the top few inches of our soils instead of far below it in oil deposits.

Our rich, abundant farmland, our production technology and our knowledgeable farmers hold the keys to reducing our dependence on foreign oil. Biodiesel from oil crops such as soybeans serves as a reliable substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel. And ethanol from grains and potentially from cellulose, offers an alternative to gasoline.

Energy from the wind and the sun also may heat and cool our homes, run our stoves and power our lights.

Biodiesel, according to the United Soybean Board, is the fastest-growing renewable energy source in the country, a trend that shows no signs of slowing down. Soybean producers, through a soybean check off have helped grow the number of soy biodiesel retailers and distributors from about 450 in 2002 to close to 3,000 today. And the number continues to increase almost daily.

Those efforts also helped increase the number of farmers using biodiesel to one in two. The National Biodiesel Board (NBB) figures show 50 U.S. biodiesel manufacturers in operation with another 50 planned.

Demand for and production of renewable fuels is “expanding fast,” says Bob Deneen, president of the Renewable Fuels Association. “We have 101 ethanol plants in operation with another 42 under construction,” he says.

Those plants currently account for 5 billion gallons of ethanol per year with the 42 coming on expected to add another 3 billion. “Three years ago, we were just above 2 billion gallons a year,” Deneen says.

“We’ve doubled production in three years. We will double again in five years.”

It’s been a slow ride to get this far. “It took us 13 years to get the first 1 billion gallon output and another 10 years to get to 2 billion. That’s 23 years to reach 2 billion gallons. The growth rate since has grown exponentially.”

Deneen says renewable fuels production is a key component of the U.S. energy policy. Currently, ethanol is a component of 40 percent of the nation’s gasoline. In California and several other states, every gallon of gasoline contains ethanol.

“Two years ago, there was no ethanol in gasoline in New York; now it’s included in 100 percent. The market growth has been remarkable. The $70 per barrel price for oil plays a big part,” Deneen says. “But U.S. consumers also want a clean, renewable, domestic energy source.”

e-mail: rsmith@farmpress.com