1. Even in Death, Bachelor Farmer's Land Stirs Legal Fight: Gerald Mahr received $1.2 million for a section of his farmland in 2005. But by the time he died in 2011, Mahr had little left in the bank — $433. The remainder of his farmland, possibly worth millions more, has become a legal prize for a host of grabbing hands. (Journal Sentinel)

2. Selling Farms Calls for Creative Deals: Selling a farm can be costly and complicated. The need to be innovative in selling farms to the next generation is becoming more urgent as farmland prices rise and farmers get older. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)

3. Regulating Ourselves to Death: When Kelly Vander Kley Hunter bought a tiny farm three years ago, she unwittingly stepped into a regulatory minefield. Two donkeys, one horse, one turkey, chickens and ducks were cause enough to bring the regulatory Gestapo to her doorstep. (Reason)

4. Heavy-handed EPA: EPA agents are wearing body armor and carrying guns to check on Clean Water Act violations? (Alaska Dispatch)

5. Riding in the Box with a Maverick: He’s been in the box for 12 hours straight, peeling back layers of Mississippi farmland — coordinating and commanding on a sea of dirt. He shuts down the tractor, climbs down from his perch, and breathes in the smell of broken ground. This is his world — Robert Precht has dirt in his blood. (Delta Farm Press)

 

Got an interesting or odd ag story I've missed? Please send links to cbennett@farmpress.com.

 

6. 'Big Data' Will Change the Way You Farm: Big data. If you haven’t yet heard that term dropped in casual conversation with other farmers, you likely will — soon. (Southeast Farm Press)

7. Bt Future: Farming a toxin to protect crops, pollinators and people. (Scientific American)

8. Dueling Propane Cannons at Vineyard: Vineyard propane cannon sparks revenge tactics. (San Francisco Chronicle)

9. Farmers Planting Winter Wheat as GM Source Still a Mystery: Oregon farmers are moving ahead with plans to start planting their next crop as questions remain about the source of a patch of genetically modified wheat found in a farmer’s field there last spring. (Washington Post)

10. Barn? Or Mummies? Theater of the bizarre: A Chinese farmer is accused of tomb robbing after digging up two mummies so he could build a barn. (Daily Mail)

 

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From the "10" archives

10 agriculture stories you should read today, Sept. 3

10 agriculture stories you should read today, Aug. 26

10 agriculture stories you should read today, Aug. 19

10 agriculture stories you should read today, Aug. 12