World Ag Expo is calling for video submissions to tell the story of agriculture for a chance to win $3,000. The contest will focus on World Ag Expo's theme for 2014, “Feeding Tomorrow's World.”

Entrants are asked to tell the true story of agriculture and the people who work to provide the products we enjoy.

Entries will be evaluated by a panel of judges. The top videos will be posted at www.WorldAgExpo.org and the public will vote for their favorites beginning in December 2013.

“Farmers and ranchers are dedicated to providing us with a safe and consistent supply of food and fiber. We want the public's help to tell their stories,” said Jerry Sinift, chief executive officer of the International Agri-Center.

“The contest challenges you to come up with a creative way to tell the great story of agriculture, and we can't wait to see the results!”

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The winner will be announced Jan. 31, 2014 and awarded the $3,000 cash prize. The top video will be posted on World Ag Expo's website; will play during the show, Feb. 11-13, 2014 in Tulare, Calif.; and the winner will be recognized at World Ag Expo.

To enter, upload your video to your own YouTube or Vimeo account and complete the online entry form on the World Ag Expo website.

Videos must be at least 30 seconds long and may not exceed six minutes. Anyone 30 years of age or younger is eligible to enter.

All videos must be submitted by Dec. 1, 2013.

Visit www.WorldAgExpo.org for full rules and the online entry form.

The International Agri-Center is home to World Ag Expo, February 11-13, 2014 in Tulare, Calif. An estimated annual average of 100,000 individuals from 70 countries attends World Ag Expo each year.

The Expo is the largest annual agricultural show of its kind with 1,400 exhibitors displaying cutting-edge agricultural technology and equipment on 2.6 million square feet of show grounds.

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