Highlights from the analysis of each is below:

Meat: A significant portion of Japan’s pork, poultry and beef industries are located in the impacted region. Primary production damage could translate into a loss of total meat output of between 70,000 tons and 350,000 tons in the worst case scenario. Power shortages following the earthquake have damaged large volumes of meat in cold storage. Increased reliance on imports may trigger safeguard tariff increases for beef or pork. Poultry production was already affected due to the recent bird flu outbreak.

Dairy: The damaged area accounts for 15 percent of Japan’s dairy production, but the largest dairy producing region in Hokkaido has not reported any food-safety issues. Since Japan is one of the world’s largest cheese importers, attention will be focused mainly on trade flows for this product.

Seafood: The seafood production industry in Japan is reported to be experiencing widespread damage. The earthquake and tsunami destroyed many fishing ports and vessels, and washed away both aquaculture and wild seedbeds for key products such as scallops and oysters. Contamination of seawater is causing consumers to a shift away from fresh local seafood to canned or imported products. Import bans in other countries are impacting not only Japan’s exports, but are forcing Japanese seafood restaurants around the world to source product elsewhere.

Vegetables and fruit: Reports indicate the earthquake and the tsunami destroyed vegetable farms and orchards in the northeastern part of Japan. Excessive radioactive matter found in locally produced vegetables and fruits could harm local consumer confidence. As a result, vegetable and fruit imports are expected to increase in the coming months.

Grains: Japan is heavily dependent on imported wheat. Most processing mills are outside the damage zone but power shortages are temporarily impacting processing production. Japan estimates15 percent of its compound feed industry capacity was damaged.

Rice: The earthquake had no immediate impact on rice production, but concerns about soil contamination will affect the next planting in April and May.  Due to high year-end stock, the availability of rice is not immediately threatened. There is no immediate need for imports in response to the natural disaster.