University of California-Davis researcher Valerie Eviner has received the 2007 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. Her research was funded by the USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service.

USDA nominated Eviner for her innovative research in developing a creative method to manage rangeland and quantify its productivity. This new method incorporates seedling residual dry matter to increase the quality and quantity of forage, recycle nutrients, reduce erosion and manage the incursion of invasive weeds. Eviner's research, which addresses many of the substantive issues currently facing the nation's rangeland managers, will enhance the productivity and economic viability of ranchers, improve natural resource use and have economic and environmental benefits for the industry. The work was funded by the CSREES National Research Initiative Managed Ecosystems program.

Eviner involved students, ranchers, research and extension centers, and environmental organizations to provide students with practical experience in using scientific research to answer to relevant management problems.

Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers nominees are selected for their innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology. Nominees show exceptional potential to shape the future through intellectual and inspired leadership. Educational activities reflect a spirit of community service to help understand the nature and implications of scientific research.

Through federal funding and leadership for research, education and extension programs, CSREES focuses on investing in science and solving critical issues impacting daily lives and the nation's future.