The USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service yesterday confirmed the nation’s fourth case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a dairy cow from central California.

(A statement from USDA Chief Veterinary Officer John Clifford making the announcement can be found here).

Following the USDA announcement, several livestock industry organizations issued statements regarding the discovery. The groups praised USDA’s surveillance program and stressed there is no risk to human health.

Following is a summary of the statements, beginning with the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Cattle Health and Well-being Committee Chairman Tom Talbot issued the following statement regarding the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) confirmation of an atypical case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in a dairy cow in central California.

“USDA confirmed this afternoon a positive test result as part of its targeted surveillance program to test cattle for BSE. USDA has confirmed this dairy animal was discovered at a rendering facility and was never presented for human consumption and poses zero risk to human health. The bottom line remains the same — all U.S. beef is safe.

“America’s cattle producers’ top priority is raising healthy cattle. As such, the U.S. beef community has collaborated with and worked with animal health experts and government to put in place multiple interlocking safeguards over the past two decades to prevent BSE from taking hold in the United States.

“This effort was recognized in May 2007 when the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the leading international body for animal health, formally classified the United States as a controlled risk country for BSE. The controlled risk classification recognizes that U.S. regulatory controls are effective and that U.S fresh beef and beef products from cattle of all ages are safe and can be safely traded due to our interlocking safeguards.

“USDA’s ongoing BSE surveillance program tests approximately 40,000 high-risk cattle annually, bringing the total of tested animals to more than 1 million since the program began. BSE is fast approaching eradication worldwide. According to USDA, there were only 29 cases of BSE worldwide in 2011, which is a 99 percent reduction since the peak in 1992 of more than 37,300 cases.

“We commend USDA and animal health experts for effectively identifying and eliminating the potential risks associated with BSE.”

For additional information, visit http://www.beef.org/.