Two separate quarantines are in place in Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties after white-striped fruit flies and Oriental fruit flies were detected in La Verne.

The white-striped fruit fly quarantine measures 81 square miles, bordered on the west by Grand Avenue in Glendora; on the south by W. Holt Avenue in Pomona; on the east by N. Mountain Avenue in Upland; and on the north by a straight line through the San Gabriel Mountains, between N. Mountain Avenue and Glendora Mountain Road. Additional information about the quarantine, including a map, is available at: http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/PHPPS/PE/InteriorExclusion/wsff_quarantine.html.

The Oriental fruit fly quarantine measures 84 square miles and is bordered on the west by Grand Avenue in Glendora; on the south by W. Temple Avenue in Pomona; on the east by the Los Angeles/San Bernardino county line; and on the north by a straight line through the San Gabriel Mountains, between Mt. Baldy Road and Glendora Mountain Road. Additional information about this quarantine, including a map, is available at: http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/phpps/pe/InteriorExclusion/off_quarantine.html.

The movement of host fruits and plants grown in the quarantine areas is restricted. Residents living within the boundaries are asked not to move host plants and materials from their property.

Seven white-striped fruit flies were detected recently in traps in the La Verne area, marking the first time this pest has been detected in the Western Hemisphere. The fly is native to tropical Southeast Asia, where it damages the fruit of many trees, most notably guava and mango. Damage occurs when the female lays eggs inside the fruit. The eggs hatch into maggots that tunnel through the flesh of the fruit, making it unfit for consumption.

Four Oriental fruit flies were also recently discovered in the La Verne area. The pest is known to target over 230 different fruit, vegetable and plant commodities. Damage occurs when the female lays eggs inside the fruit. The eggs hatch into maggots that tunnel through the flesh of the fruit, making it unfit for consumption.

Eradication programs for each infestation are already underway – both relying largely on "male attractant" techniques featuring fly attractant mixed with a small amount of pesticide. The flies are drawn to the attractant and killed.