A workshop for Central California citrus growers entitled “Improving Fruit Quality and Net Profits with Irrigation” is scheduled for this Thursday, June 14, at the University of California Ag Center, Parlier, Calif.

It starts at 8:45 and ends at noon with a free lunch and a presentation of the positive points system for citrus growers.

Presentations scheduled include:

Citrus Packout—How to evaluate this information:

Sunkist Representative (What the market wants) and

Grower Nick Hill of Dinuba, Calif., (the connection between field and packinghouse)

Effects of Deficit Irrigation on Navel Orange Production:

Dave Goldhamer, UCCE Irrigation Specialist, Kearney Ag Center

Irrigation System Evaluation—How it is done, how it can help you:

Brian Hockett, NW Kern RCD, Mobile Irrigation Lab.

Know Your Soil—How water moves in the soil, common problems:

Edd Russell, Area Resource Soil Scientist, USDA-NRCS

Ways to Monitor the Irrigation—In the soil, plant or atmosphere:

Larry Schwankl, UCCE Irrigation Specialist, Kearney Ag Center

From Identifying Problems to Making Solutions Work:

Mark Freeman, UCCE Farm Advisor, Fresno County

Noon: Lunch Presentation:

The Positive Points System for Citrus: What is it and Why Should a Grower Get Involved?

Beth Grafton-Cardwell, Department of Entomology UC Riverside, stationed at the Kearney Agricultural Center and Director of Lindcove Research and Extension Center will present an overview of the positive points system (PPS) for citrus.

For the past 6 years, a group of UC extension specialists, farm advisors, and citrus growers have been working together to develop this point system.

The PPS for citrus is a set of 220 questions that cover topics in seven categories of citrus production to assessment individual production practices. These topics include horticulture, soils, water, pest management, post harvest issues, food safety and continuing education.

The PPA can identify areas of citrus management that need attention. It also provides documentation for regulatory agencies that you are protecting groundwater and air quality.

The Regional Water Quality Control Board accepts the PPS as documentation of a farm plan.

The PPS also documents for consumers that food is safe from disease and chemical contamination (Good Agricultural Practices)

To reserve a free lunch, please RSVP to Lois Strole at the Kearney Ag Center by Monday, June 11, 559-646-6545.