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Operation Danish Bacon is not about animal rights

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  • The military should always be allowed to train surgeons with pigs or other live animals, despite protests from PETA.

Operation Danish Bacon is killing for the right reason. Training field surgeons for the treatment of combat wounds often requires the use of live animals, and the practice, despite the howls of PETA, saves human lives.

Picture this: A living, breathing pig is dangled from a wooden frame and marked with clear target circles drawn on its body. Across the room a man stands with a gun — maybe an AK-47 rifle or a 9mm handgun — and the pig essentially serves as sniper bait. The pig is shot from close range multiple times and there are no tidy bullet holes and exit points, just gaping wounds and mangled organs. There is no attempt at a kill shot, and quite the opposite is true, with the marked circles covering various organs intended for damage and not immediate death.

It’s grim — but not what it seems.

The pigs are anesthetized before being shot by Danish soldiers and then operated on by military surgeons, and killed following surgery, successful or not. Essentially, army medics are trained on live animals, with the purpose to save injured combat soldiers in the field, and the process has been informally tagged “Operation Danish Bacon.” (Denmark is at the center of another animal rights controversy and this one is not about the giraffe killed at the Copenhagen zoo.)

The U.S. military has long used animals for surgical training. From a 2006 New York Times article quoting trauma medic Dustin E. Kirby: “The idea is to work with live tissue. You get a pig and you keep it alive. And every time I did something to help him, they would wound him again. So you see what shock does, and what happens when more wounds are received by a wounded creature.

 

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“My pig?” he said. “They shot him twice in the face with a 9-millimeter pistol, and then six times with an AK-47 and then twice with a 12-gauge shotgun. And then he was set on fire. I kept him alive for 15 hours,” he said. “That was my pig.”

Brutal? Yes. But combat wounds are horrific and far from the clean punctures of movies, and surgeons gain invaluable experience working in a live training environment. The pigs are killed to save human lives.

The UK military has been sending surgeons to Denmark for training (live animal training is banned in the UK) and PETA has claimed outrage, demanding an end to the practice.

Discuss this Blog Entry 4

Myc (not verified)
on Feb 25, 2014

"PETA’s tears should fall for fallen soldiers and not dead pigs." this statement is typical of all that is wrong with the world today. Humans think that the rest of the life on this planet is here for us to use and abuse. Would the response be the same if they were mutilating people's pet dogs to practice surgery on? I think not.

Toribeth (not verified)
on Feb 25, 2014

We should be putting our efforts to ending war. Peace is such a simple solution to so much pain and horror.

von Groen (not verified)
on Feb 25, 2014

Now that's bordering on psychopathy.

James Withs (not verified)
on Feb 27, 2014

How you anyone can justify this barbaric and sickening practice I will never know. Quite honestly I hope anyone who is involved in this suffers a fate worst than the pigs, no more than they deserve.

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