Detections of adult glassy-winged sharpshooters climbed to 217 as of Aug. 29, up from 130 reported on Aug. 1, according to the Arizona Department of Agriculture (ADA). All detections remained within the 144-square-mile area in Sierra Vista, Ariz.

The sharpshooter, a half-inch-long leafhopper, is the primary carrier of Pierce’s Disease, an infection of the plant with no viable remedy, which threatens vineyards, citrus crops and the oleander ornamental plant. Of the 429 properties scheduled for treatment by the ADA, 202 properties or 47 percent have been treated.

Statewide, 4,467 traps have been placed including: Phoenix – 1,607 of the planned 4,000 traps (40 percent); Tucson – 732 of 1,000 traps (73 percent); Yuma – 390 of 500 traps (78 percent); and San Simon – 1,492 traps of 1,500 (99 percent). The ADA said 246 traps had been placed in other areas.

Meanwhile, statewide survey and detection efforts continue. “The ADA has cooperative programs in place with vineyard owners across the state to partner with them to extend our detection capabilities through their own monitoring of their vineyards with traps and screening expertise provided by the department,” said Shilo Mitchell, a spokesperson with Gov. Janet Napolitano’s office. Trap recovery and screening on an ongoing basis, while inspectors place new traps simultaneously, are influencing the rate of new trap deployments, she said.

On Aug. 1, Gov. Napolitano allocated $528,000 to help cover personnel, transportation, treatments and trapping costs through June 2007. The ADA also announced an external quarantine order prohibiting host materials from entering Arizona, unless it has been treated or comes from a nursery that has been certified as glassy-winged sharpshooter free.

e-mail: cblake@farmpress.com